January 28th is Data Privacy Day: Choose Good Passwords and Hardware Wallets, Avoid Sensitive Posts

Today, January 28th is data privacy day. This day should remind us to protect our privacy, control our digital footprint and even to keep our money safe.

How do we do that? For starters, 

Choose Good Passwords

A good password consists of at least three types of characters: lowercase letters [a-z], uppercase letters [A-Z]and number [0-9]. They are also at least 8 characters long. Visit passwordsgenerator.net to generate such a password, for example:

Hf9lyIwury6WX4Mv

Never pick a password from this list:

123456
12345678
password
qwerty
abc123
111111
iloveyou
adobe123
123123
admin
photoshop
password1
trustno1
000000

Social Media

Understand that all of your posts, pictures and comments on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, and Twitter is stored forever. Practically, advertisers and the government have access to this information, create profiles about you. They then can better target ads or classify you as potential security threat. Be aware of this and constrain your digital footprint to nonsensitive areas.

Keep Money Safe

If you do online backing, good passwords are crucial. Better yet, use two-factor authentication (2FA). Essentially, whenever you log into your backing account, a code is sent to an authenticator app on your phone. You must read this code and enter when logging. 

Should you be fortunate enough to own crypto currencies such as bitcoin, your private keys are of utmost importance. If you lose them, or they are stolen, then no one can help. Therefore, my recommendation is:

Hardware Wallets: Use hardware wallets to keep your private keys safe. A hardware wallet is a flash drive like device, designed specifically for storing your bitcoins. The Nano Ledger or Trezor brands are good choices. 

Remember better safe than sorry.

Dirk Wagner

About Dirk Wagner

Dirk Wagner is owner of Tutorz LLC. He holds a M.S. degree in computer science and has 8 years of experience as software engineer and researcher. Dirk has tutored math and computer science to dozens of students in Southern California. You can find him on Google+, youtube, facebook, twitter, tumblr, quora and pinterest.
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